home Recent Renderings school rendering resort rendering residential rendering misc. projects articles
about us office rendering hospital rendering retail rendering church rendering award winning links
clients tree rendering sky rendering people rendering car rendering vegetable rendering contacts
 
Architectural Rendering 3DS Rendering 3D Architect 3D Computer Architectural Renderings

 

3D Animation

3D Animation Rendering

3D Animation Studio

3D Computer Animation

3D Rendering And Animation

3D Rendering Animation

Animation And 3D

Architectural Animation

Architecture Animation

Rendering And Animation

 


3D Animation Rendering   |   3D Animation


Computer animation is the process used for generating animated images by using computer graphics. The more general term computer generated imagery encompasses both static scenes and dynamic images, while computer animation only refers to moving images.

Modern computer animation usually uses 3D computer graphics, although 2D computer graphics are still used for stylistic, low bandwidth, and faster real-time renderings. Sometimes the target of the animation is the computer itself, but sometimes the target is another medium, such as film.

Computer animation is essentially a digital successor to the stop motion techniques used in traditional animation with 3D models and frame-by-frame animation of 2D illustrations. Computer generated animations are more controllable than other more physically based processes, such as constructing miniatures for effects shots or hiring extras for crowd scenes, and because it allows the creation of images that would not be feasible using any other technology. It can also allow a single graphic artist to produce such content without the use of actors, expensive set pieces, or props.

To create the illusion of movement, an image is displayed on the computer screen and repeatedly replaced by a new image that is similar to the previous image, but advanced slightly in the time domain (usually at a rate of 24 or 30 frames/second). This technique is identical to how the illusion of movement is achieved with television and motion pictures.

For 3D animations, objects (models) are built on the computer monitor (modeled) and 3D figures are rigged with a virtual skeleton. For 2D figure animations, separate objects (illustrations) and separate transparent layers are used, with or without a virtual skeleton. Then the limbs, eyes, mouth, clothes, etc. of the figure are moved by the animator on key frames. The differences in appearance between key frames are automatically calculated by the computer in a process known as tweening or morphing. Finally, the animation is rendered.

For 3D animations, all frames must be rendered after modeling is complete. For 2D vector animations, the rendering process is the key frame illustration process, while tweened frames are rendered as needed. For pre-recorded presentations, the rendered frames are transferred to a different format or medium such as film or digital video. The frames may also be rendered in real time as they are presented to the end-user audience. Low bandwidth animations transmitted via the internet (e.g. 2D Flash, X3D) often use software on the end-users computer to render in real time as an alternative to streaming or pre-loaded high bandwidth animations.

The screen is blanked to a background color, such as black. Then, a goat is drawn on the right of the screen. Next, the screen is blanked, but the goat is re-drawn or duplicated slightly to the left of its original position. This process is repeated, each time moving the goat a bit to the left. If this process is repeated fast enough, the goat will appear to move smoothly to the left. This basic procedure is used for all moving pictures in films and television.

The moving goat is an example of shifting the location of an object. More complex transformations of object properties such as size, shape, lighting effects often require calculations and computer rendering instead of simple re-drawing or duplication.

To trick the eye and brain into thinking they are seeing a smoothly moving object, the pictures should be drawn at around 12 frames per second (frame/s) or faster (a frame is one complete image). With rates above 70 frames/s no improvement in realism or smoothness is perceivable due to the way the eye and brain process images. At rates below 12 frame/s most people can detect jerkiness associated with the drawing of new images which detracts from the illusion of realistic movement. Conventional hand-drawn cartoon animation often uses 15 frames/s in order to save on the number of drawings needed, but this is usually accepted because of the stylized nature of cartoons. Because it produces more realistic imagery computer animation demands higher frame rates to reinforce this realism.

Movie film seen in theaters in the United States runs at 24 frames per second, which is sufficient to create the illusion of continuous movement.

One of the earliest steps in the history of computer animation was the 1973 movie Westworld, a science-fiction film about a society in which robots live and work among humans, though the first use of 3D Wireframe imagery was in its sequel, Futureworld (1976), which featured a computer-generated hand and face created by then University of Utah graduate students Edwin Catmull and Fred Parke.

Developments in CGI technologies are reported each year at SIGGRAPH, an annual conference on computer graphics and interactive techniques, attended each year by tens of thousands of computer professionals. Developers of computer games and 3D video cards strive to achieve the same visual quality on personal computers in real-time as is possible for CGI films and animation. With the rapid advancement of real-time rendering quality, artists began to use game engines to render non-interactive movies. This art form is called machinima.

 

 

For many years, I have lived uncomfortably with the belief that most planning and architectural design suffers for lack of real and basic purpose. The ultimate purpose, it seems to me, must be the improvement of mankind.
James Rouse

I am but an architectural composer.
Alexander Jackson Davis

I hope that America as a whole, and especially its architects, will become more seriously involved in producing a new architectural culture that would bring the nation to the apex - where it has stood before - and lead the world.
Tadao Ando

I look upon myself as a musical bricklayer with architectural aspirations.
Robert Mayer

I'd say that my profession ends where architectural thinking ends - architectural thinking in terms of thinking about programs and organizational structure. These abstractions play a role in many other disciplines, and those disciplines are now defining their 'architectures' as well.
Rem Koolhaas

I'm not an architectural composer.
Harrison Birtwistle

It fills one with a sense of architectural possibility.
Paul Goldberger

It was always my intention that The Frieze should be housed in a room which would provide a suitable architectural frame for it.
Edvard Munch

Profit and bottom line, the contemporary mantra, eliminates the very source of architectural expression.
Arthur Erickson

Supply and demand regulate architectural form.
Adolf Loos

The center of Western culture is Greece, and we have never lost our ties with the architectural concepts of that ancient civilization.
Stephen Gardiner
 

 
10,000+ Architectural Illustrations - A Fountain of Inspiration!
Architectural Designs Architectural Styles House Designs Architectural Images Architectural Interior Architectural Plans 3D Design 3D Architecture
3D Animation 3D Graphics 3D Model Pen And Ink Rendering In 3D Visualization Rendering What Is Rendering Architectural And Design

digital renderings

airport apartment bank church condominium entertainment elevation
  health care hospitality house industrial landscaping library floor plan
misc. museum office resort school shopping center sports facility  transportation
misc2 bar bedroom dining room hall house interior hotel room karaoke
  living room restaurant store exterior office-hall interior swimming

hand drawing

acrylic charcoal color pencil marker pen ink pencil watercolour
pen color color paper mixed-media        
 
Memorial Architecture Commemorative Architecture Monumental Building Monumental Architecture Memorial Sculpture

Archi-Vision Studio Canada
3986 Teakwood Dr, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5C 3T5
TEL:  905.615.9315  FAX:  905.615.0613
website:
www.Lart.biz email: info@Lart.biz